Bill S1313-2013

Creates a pilot program for bulk purchase electronic textbook delivery in the State University of New York and the City University of New York library systems

Creates a pilot program for bulk purchase electronic textbook delivery in the State University of New York and the City University of New York library systems.

Details

Actions

  • Jan 8, 2014: REFERRED TO HIGHER EDUCATION
  • Jan 9, 2013: REFERRED TO HIGHER EDUCATION

Memo

BILL NUMBER:S1313

TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the education law, in relation to creating a pilot program for bulk purchase electronic textbook delivery in the state and city university library systems

PURPOSE OR GENERAL IDEA OF BILL: Creates a pilot program for bulk purchase electronic textbook delivery in the State university of New York and City University of New York library system.

SUMMARY OF SPECIFIC PROVISIONS: The education law is amended by adding a new section 706:

*Establishes a pilot program for bulk purchase electronic textbook delivery through the library systems at the State University of New York (SUNY) and City university of New York (CUNY) to enable students to access electronic textbooks and course materials through the university library systems;

*Provides criteria for colleges and universities to be eligible for the program;

*Requires the chancellors of SUNY and CUNY to evaluate the results of the program and report to the Governor and' legislature on its impact on student textbook spending, students' experiences with electronic textbooks, faculty experiences with identifying and using electronic textbooks, library staff time, and other infrastructure impacts.

JUSTIFICATION: In New York State, the rising cost of college textbooks most directly affects the state's nearly 625,000 undergraduate public University students. According to Student Monitor, students attending a four-year college spent an average of $598 on textbooks in 2010-11. The states of Washington and California have already begun introducing online textbooks. In Washington, an electronic library of books -- free of charge -- has been made available for 42 community college courses. California has proposed a similar program for 50 courses at their public colleges. New York could be a leader in the movement towards electronic textbook delivery. As it stands, the increasing cost of textbooks presents a barrier to low and moderate-income families in New York State who want pursue higher education.

This bill establishes a pilot program to assess the potential for reducing the costs of higher education at New York's public universities by expanding the role of libraries and using electronic textbooks and other library resources.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: This bill was previously introduced.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: To be determined.

EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect on the one hundred and eightieth day after it shall have become a law; provided, however, that effective immediately, the addition, amendment and/or repeal of any rule or regulation necessary for the implementation of this act on its effective date is authorized and directed to be made and completed on or before such effective date.


Text

STATE OF NEW YORK ________________________________________________________________________ 1313 2013-2014 Regular Sessions IN SENATE (PREFILED) January 9, 2013 ___________
Introduced by Sen. STAVISKY -- read twice and ordered printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Higher Education AN ACT to amend the education law, in relation to creating a pilot program for bulk purchase electronic textbook delivery in the state and city university library systems THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The education law is amended by adding a new section 706 to read as follows: S 706. BULK PURCHASE ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK DELIVERY PROGRAM. 1. THERE IS HEREBY ESTABLISHED IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AND THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK A PILOT PROGRAM FOR BULK PURCHASE ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK DELIVERY THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SYSTEMS. 2. THE PURPOSE OF THIS PROGRAM IS TO ENABLE STUDENTS TO ACCESS COURSE MATERIALS ELECTRONICALLY THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SYSTEMS. 3. FOUR YEAR COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES WITH A MINIMUM UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT OF SIX THOUSAND FULL TIME STUDENTS MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY MUST PROVIDE STUDENTS ACCESS TO NECESSARY TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PARTICIPATION IN THE PROGRAM, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE DISTRIBUTION OF NETBOOKS OR BY INITIATING LEASE-TO- OWN PROGRAMS FOR COMPUTERS AND LAPTOPS. 4. UPON THE COMPLETION OF TWO YEARS OF OPERATION, THE CHANCELLORS OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AND THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SHALL EVALUATE THE RESULTS OF THE PILOT PROGRAM AND REPORT TO THE GOVER- NOR AND THE LEGISLATURE ITS IMPACT ON: A. STUDENT TEXTBOOK SPENDING; B. STUDENTS' EXPERIENCE WITH ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK TECHNOLOGIES AS THEY RELATE TO ACQUIRING THE COURSE MATERIALS, ENGAGING WITH COURSE CONTENT, AND MEETING LEARNING OBJECTIVES;
C. FACULTY EXPERIENCES WITH IDENTIFYING AND USING ELECTRONIC TEXT- BOOKS; AND D. LIBRARY STAFF TIME AND DEMANDS TO INFRASTRUCTURE. S 2. This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall have become a law; provided, however, that effective immediately, the addition, amendment and/or repeal of any rule or regu- lation necessary for the implementation of this act on its effective date is authorized and directed to be made and completed on or before such effective date.

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