This bill has been amended

Bill S270A-2013

Requires facilities to perform pulse oximetry screening on newborns

Requires facilities to perform pulse oximetry screening on newborns.

Details

Actions

  • May 7, 2013: REPORTED AND COMMITTED TO FINANCE
  • Apr 25, 2013: PRINT NUMBER 270A
  • Apr 25, 2013: AMEND (T) AND RECOMMIT TO HEALTH
  • Jan 9, 2013: REFERRED TO HEALTH

Votes

VOTE: COMMITTEE VOTE: - Health - May 7, 2013
Ayes (14): Hannon, Ball, Farley, Felder, Fuschillo, Golden, Larkin, Savino, Young, Rivera, Hassell-Thompson, Adams, Peralta, O'Brien
Ayes W/R (1): Seward
Excused (1): Montgomery

Memo

BILL NUMBER:S270A

TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the public health law, in relation to requiring facilities to screen newborns for critical congenital heart defects through pulse oximetry screening

PURPOSE: Requires facilities to perform pulse oximetry screening on newborns for critical congenital heart defects.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS: Section 1: Legislative Intent

Section 2: Establishes a program to screen newborn infants for critical congenital heart defects through pulse oximetry screening.

Section 3: Effective Date.

JUSTIFICATION: This bill requires each birthing facility in the state of New York be required to perform a pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital birth defects (CHDs), a minimum of 24 hours after birth, on every newborn in its care. For newborns, pulse oximetry screening involves taping a small sensor to a newborn's foot while the sensor beams red light through the foot to measure how much oxygen is in the blood, Pulse oximetry screening is effective at detecting CHDs that may otherwise go undetected by current screening methods. Pulse oximetry screenings are noninvasive, painless, and take approximately one minute to perform. According to the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services' Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children, congenital heart disease affects approximately seven to nine of every 1,000 live births in the United States and Europe; the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that CHD is the leading cause of infant death due to birth defects, and that about 4,800 babies born every year have CCHDs. Current methods used to detect CHDs include prenatal ultrasound screening and repeated clinical examinations; however, prenatal ultrasound screenings, alone, identify less than half of all CHD cases. Many newborn lives could potentially be saved by requiring birthing facilities to incorporate pulse oximetry screening as a method for early detection of CHDs in conjunction with current CHD screening methods.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: 2012-S.6726-Passed Senate

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: None to the state.

EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall have become a law; provided, however, that effective immediately, the addition, amendment and/or repeal of any rule or regulation necessary for the implementation of this act on its effective date are authorized and directed to be made and completed on or before such effective date.


Text

STATE OF NEW YORK ________________________________________________________________________ 270--A 2013-2014 Regular Sessions IN SENATE (PREFILED) January 9, 2013 ___________
Introduced by Sens. LARKIN, ADDABBO, BOYLE, BRESLIN, GRISANTI, KRUEGER, LATIMER, LAVALLE, MAZIARZ, MONTGOMERY, PERALTA -- read twice and ordered printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Health -- committee discharged, bill amended, ordered reprinted as amended and recommitted to said committee AN ACT to amend the public health law, in relation to requiring facili- ties to screen newborns for critical congenital heart defects through pulse oximetry screening THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Legislative intent. Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are structural abnormalities of the heart that are present at birth; CHDs range in severity from simple problems such as holes between chambers of the heart, to severe malformations, such as the complete absence of one or more chambers or valves; critical CHDs (CCHDs) are a subset of CHDs that cause severe and life-threatening symptoms which require inter- vention within the first days, weeks or months of life. According to the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services' Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children, congenital heart disease affects approximately seven to nine of every 1,000 live births in the United States and Europe. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that CHD is the leading cause of infant death due to birth defects and that about forty-eight hundred babies born each year have one of seven CCHDs. Current methods for detecting CHDs generally include prenatal ultra- sound screening and repeated clinical examinations; while prenatal ultrasound screenings can detect some major CHDs, these screenings, alone, identify less than half of all CHD cases. CCHD cases are often missed during routine clinical exams performed prior to a newborn's discharge from a birthing facility.
Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive test that estimates the percentage of hemoglobin in blood that is saturated with oxygen. When performed on a newborn a minimum of 24 hours after birth, pulse oximetry screening is often more effective at detecting critical, life-threatening CHDs which otherwise go undetected by current screening methods. Newborns with abnormal pulse oximetry results require immediate confirmatory testing and intervention. The legislature finds and declares that many newborn lives could potentially be saved by earlier detection and treatment of CHDs if birthing facilities in the state of New York were required to perform this simple, non-invasive newborn screening in conjunction with current CHD screening methods. S 2. The public health law is amended by adding a new section 2500-k to read as follows: S 2500-K. NEWBORN INFANT CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DEFECT SCREENING. 1. THE COMMISSIONER SHALL ESTABLISH A PROGRAM TO SCREEN NEWBORN INFANTS FOR CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS THROUGH PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING. IT SHALL BE THE DUTY OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER OR OTHER DESIGNATED PERSON AT EACH FACILITY LICENSED PURSUANT TO ARTICLE TWENTY-EIGHT OF THIS CHAPTER CARING FOR NEWBORN INFANTS TO PERFORM A PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING FOR CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS A MINIMUM OF TWENTY-FOUR HOURS AFTER BIRTH ON EVERY NEWBORN INFANT IN ITS CARE. 2. FACILITIES SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION THAT ADMINIS- TER A NEWBORN INFANT PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING FOR CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS SHALL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT IN A MANNER AND FORMAT REQUIRED BY THE COMMISSIONER: (A) THE RESULTS OF EACH NEWBORN INFANT PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING FOR CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS PERFORMED; AND (B) SUCH OTHER INFORMATION OR DATA AS MAY BE REQUIRED BY THE COMMIS- SIONER PURSUANT TO REGULATION TO FULFILL THE PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION. S 3. This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall have become a law; provided, however, that effective immediate- ly, the addition, amendment and/or repeal of any rule or regulation necessary for the implementation of this act on its effective date are authorized and directed to be made and completed on or before such effective date.

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