Bill S3094A-2013

Establishes a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafeterias

Establishes a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafeterias.

Details

Actions

  • May 9, 2014: PRINT NUMBER 3094A
  • May 9, 2014: AMEND (T) AND RECOMMIT TO FINANCE
  • May 6, 2014: REPORTED AND COMMITTED TO FINANCE
  • Mar 11, 2014: NOTICE OF COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION - REQUESTED
  • Jan 8, 2014: REFERRED TO HEALTH
  • Jun 21, 2013: COMMITTED TO RULES
  • Jun 12, 2013: ADVANCED TO THIRD READING
  • Jun 11, 2013: 2ND REPORT CAL.
  • Jun 10, 2013: 1ST REPORT CAL.1164
  • Jan 30, 2013: REFERRED TO HEALTH

Memo

BILL NUMBER:S3094A

TITLE OF BILL: An act to establish a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafeterias; and providing for the repeal of such provisions upon expiration thereof

PURPOSE: To provide safety for those with food allergies who are served through owned, operated or leased state businesses.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:

Section One of the bill creates a pilot program making the gluten content of food available at certain state cafeterias, and providing for repeal upon expiration thereof.

Section Two provides this act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall become law, and shall expire and be deemed repealed three years after such date.

JUSTIFICATION: This bill will create a pilot program to make available the gluten content of foods served in certain cafeterias owned by the state. Pursuant to this legislation, the state shall clearly and conspicuously post and make available all information regarding the gluten content of foods being served and shall have an employee available during the hours of operation with the capacity to identify gluten-free food or beverages.

Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from gluten intolerance of one form or another, ranging from gluten sensitivity to Celiac disease. Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. Celiac disease affects people in all parts of the world.

Originally thought to be a rare childhood syndrome, celiac disease is now known to be a common genetic disorder. It is also becoming more prevalent, as gluten is now used in a far wider variety of foods than in previous years. People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein present in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is found mainly in foods, but may also be found in everyday products such as medicines, vitamins and lip balms.

Celiac disease and gluten intolerance can be disabling and require sufferers to spend large amounts of time and money treating the disease or syndrome. This bill will create a pilot program designed to reduce the suffering of sufferers who patronize state-owned cafeterias as a way to determine the ultimate cost and feasibility of instituting gluten labeling requirements in all state owned, leased and operated eating establishments.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: 2011-12: S.1124 - Referred to Health 2010: S.7460 - Referred to Health

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: None.

EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall become law, and shall expire and be deemed repealed three years after such date.


Text

STATE OF NEW YORK ________________________________________________________________________ 3094--A 2013-2014 Regular Sessions IN SENATE January 30, 2013 ___________
Introduced by Sens. PARKER, DILAN, SAMPSON -- read twice and ordered printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Health -- recommitted to the Committee on Health in accordance with Senate Rule 6, sec. 8 -- reported favorably from said committee and committed to the Committee on Finance -- committee discharged, bill amended, ordered reprinted as amended and recommitted to said committee AN ACT to establish a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafete- rias; and providing for the repeal of such provisions upon expiration thereof THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, the commissioner of the office of general services shall identify four state owned buildings, facilities, or complexes where food and beverages are offered for sale to the general public or government employees in a cafeteria setting which are operated or leased by the state, for inclu- sion in a gluten content pilot program. One state owned building, facil- ity, or complex for such pilot program shall be located in each of the following cities: Albany, Buffalo, Syracuse, and New York City. The commissioner shall ensure that the cafeterias contained within the iden- tified buildings, facilities, or complexes have an employee available during the hours of operation that can accurately identify upon request whether a food or beverage item offered is gluten-free. For the purposes of this section, the term "gluten-free" shall include food or beverage that is consistent with the Food and Drug Administration's final rule to define the term "gluten-free" for voluntary use in the labeling of food. S 2. This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall have become a law, and shall expire and be deemed repealed three years after such date.

Comments

Open Legislation comments facilitate discussion of New York State legislation. All comments are subject to moderation. Comments deemed off-topic, commercial, campaign-related, self-promotional; or that contain profanity or hate speech; or that link to sites outside of the nysenate.gov domain are not permitted, and will not be published. Comment moderation is generally performed Monday through Friday.

By contributing or voting you agree to the Terms of Participation and verify you are over 13.

Discuss!

blog comments powered by Disqus