Bill S3107-2011

Requires fire company command vehicles to be equipped with a partition or cage separating the front and rear seats

Requires fire company command vehicles to be equipped with a partition or cage separating the front and rear seats.

Details

Actions

  • Mar 12, 2012: COMMITTEE DISCHARGED AND COMMITTED TO RULES
  • Mar 12, 2012: NOTICE OF COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION - REQUESTED
  • Jan 4, 2012: REFERRED TO TRANSPORTATION
  • Feb 8, 2011: REFERRED TO TRANSPORTATION

Memo

BILL NUMBER:S3107

TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the vehicle and traffic law, in relation to requiring certain emergency vehicles to be equipped with a protective screen

PURPOSE: Enactment of this legislation would require fire company command vehicles to be equipped with a partition or cage separating the front and rear seats.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS: Section 1 amends section 375 of the vehicle and traffic law by adding a new subdivision 52 to require that fire company command vehicles registered in New York State be equipped with partitions or steel cages, separating the front and back seats, so that any item from the rear seat may not be propelled into the front seating area.

EXISTING LAW: No such provision exists under current law.

JUSTIFICATION: On June 3, 2008 Daniel Shanahan Jr. died in a tragic car accident. Mr. Shanahan was the Chief of the Seneca Hose Fire Company and was on his way to work, in the Chiefs rig, when he was involved in a head-on collision which took his life. As required, there was a good deal of equipment in the rear of the Chiefs vehicle, including his air tank, which was dislodged and flew forward, ultimately causing Mr. Shanahan's death. This selfless volunteer firefighter ultimately died as a result of blunt force trauma to his head caused by his air tank, and not from the actual collision between the two vehicles.

Some may say that Daniel Shanahan Jr. gave his life to make us aware of the need to have a protective barrier and/or cage installed in vehicles of this nature to prevent this tragic accident from occurring again. There are hundreds of vehicles, similarly equipped, in use in fire companies across New York and this small safety measure could potentially save lives in the future.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: 2007-08: Referred to Rules. 2009-10: S.1945/A.6881 Referred to Transportation.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: None to New York State.

LOCAL FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: Very minor to local fire districts.

EFFECTIVE DATE: 180 days after it shall have become law.


Text

STATE OF NEW YORK ________________________________________________________________________ 3107 2011-2012 Regular Sessions IN SENATE February 8, 2011 ___________
Introduced by Sen. KENNEDY -- read twice and ordered printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Transportation AN ACT to amend the vehicle and traffic law, in relation to requiring certain emergency vehicles to be equipped with a protective screen THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Section 375 of the vehicle and traffic law is amended by adding a new subdivision 52 to read as follows: 52. FIRE COMPANY COMMAND VEHICLE PARTITIONS OR CAGES. EVERY FIRE COMPANY COMMAND VEHICLE REGISTERED IN THIS STATE AND REGISTERED OR LICENSED BY A CITY, TOWN OR VILLAGE SHALL BE EQUIPPED WITH PARTITIONS OR CAGES MADE OF STEEL OR OTHER PROTECTIVE MATERIAL OF EQUAL STRENGTH LOCATED BETWEEN AND EFFECTIVELY SEPARATING THE FRONT AND REAR SEATS AND PREVENTING ANY ITEM FROM THE REAR SEAT TO BE PROPELLED INTO THE FRONT SEAT. S 2. This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall have become a law.

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