This bill has been amended

Bill S6496-2013

Reduces the speed limit in the city of New York to twenty miles per hour

Reduces the speed limit in the city of New York to twenty miles per hour, except where a different speed is determined appropriate and is indicated by an official sign.

Details

Actions

  • Jan 29, 2014: REFERRED TO CITIES

Memo

BILL NUMBER:S6496

TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to reducing the speed limit in the city of New York to twenty miles per hour

PURPOSE OR GENERAL IDEA OF BILL:

This bill would protect pedestrians by reducing the speed limit in New York City to twenty miles per hour.

SUMMARY OF SPECIFIC PROVISIONS:

Section one of the bill would amend the administrative code of the city of New York, subdivision a of section 19-177, which sets the official speed limit for a vehicle in the city of New York. Under current law, the official speed limit is thirty miles per hour. This bill would reduce the official speed limit to twenty miles per hour except where the City Council determines a different speed limit is appropriate and an official sign indicates that a different speed limit is in effect.

JUSTIFICATION:

In New York City in 2013, nearly as many people died in traffic accidents as were murdered. The speed at which a motorist is driving correlates strongly with the likelihood that an accident with a pedestrian will be fatal. In fact, at speeds of twenty miles per hour, the likelihood that a pedestrian hit by a motorist will die is only five percent, but at just thirty miles per hour that likelihood jumps to forty five percent. Thus, by reducing the speed limit by ten miles per hour, and by empowering the City Council to make additional speed limit changes as it deems appropriate, this bill would have a significant effect on pedestrian safety.

Early numbers from this year suggest that there is a critical need for this legislation. In the first two weeks of 2014 there have been seven pedestrian fatalities in NYC from traffic accidents involving motor vehicles. On one day alone, on Manhattan's Upper West Side, there were two such fatalities - one child and one senior citizen, both crossing streets in crosswalks. This bill, by reducing the speed Limit on city streets, will protect all of New York City's pedestrians.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:

New bill.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS:

Minimal.

EFFECTIVE DATE:

This act shall take effect on the sixtieth day after it shall have


Text

STATE OF NEW YORK ________________________________________________________________________ 6496 IN SENATE January 29, 2014 ___________
Introduced by Sen. DILAN -- read twice and ordered printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Cities AN ACT to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to reducing the speed limit in the city of New York to twenty miles per hour THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Subdivision a of section 19-177 of the administrative code of the city of New York, as added by local law number 6 of the city of New York for the year 1996, is amended to read as follows: a. The official speed limit for a vehicle in the city of New York shall be [thirty] TWENTY miles per hour except where THE CITY COUNCIL DETERMINES A DIFFERENT SPEED LIMIT IS APPROPRIATE AND an official sign indicates that a different speed limit is in effect. S 2. This act shall take effect on the sixtieth day after it shall have become a law.

Comments

Open Legislation comments facilitate discussion of New York State legislation. All comments are subject to moderation. Comments deemed off-topic, commercial, campaign-related, self-promotional; or that contain profanity or hate speech; or that link to sites outside of the nysenate.gov domain are not permitted, and will not be published. Comment moderation is generally performed Monday through Friday.

By contributing or voting you agree to the Terms of Participation and verify you are over 13.

Discuss!

blog comments powered by Disqus