Bill S7503-2013

Relates to prohibiting sex offenders from residing in community residences

Prohibits sex offenders from residing in community residences.

Details

Actions

  • Jun 10, 2014: referred to correction
  • Jun 10, 2014: DELIVERED TO ASSEMBLY
  • Jun 10, 2014: PASSED SENATE
  • Jun 9, 2014: ORDERED TO THIRD READING CAL.1223
  • Jun 9, 2014: COMMITTEE DISCHARGED AND COMMITTED TO RULES
  • May 15, 2014: REFERRED TO CRIME VICTIMS, CRIME AND CORRECTION

Meetings

Calendars

Votes

VOTE: COMMITTEE VOTE: - Rules - Jun 9, 2014
Ayes (21): Skelos, Libous, Bonacic, Carlucci, Farley, Flanagan, Hannon, Larkin, LaValle, Marcellino, Maziarz, Nozzolio, Seward, Valesky, Little, Stewart-Cousins, Breslin, Dilan, Parker, Espaillat, Gianaris
Ayes W/R (3): Krueger, Montgomery, Perkins
Excused (1): Hassell-Thompson

Memo

BILL NUMBER:S7503

TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the correction law, in relation to prohibiting sex offenders from residing in community homes

PURPOSE AND JUSTIFICATION: This bill would prohibit sex offenders, who are required to be registered pursuant to the Corrections Law, from residing in a community residence. The residents of our community residences with mental disabilities are some of the most vulnerable individuals in our state. Although the community residences provide oversight and supervision in these homes, it is inappropriate that registered sex offenders, who have been determined to have committed sex crimes, should be placed in close and continual proximity to reside with these most vulnerable individuals who deserve the best care and protection that we can provide.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS: Section 1 - adds a new section 168-ee to the Corrections Law which provides that any sex offender registered pursuant to Article 6-C of the Corrections Law shall be prohibited from residing in a community residence, which, for the purposes of this section, is defined as any facility operated by or subject to licensure by the Office of Mental Health or the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities which provides a supervised residence or residential respite services for individuals with mental disabilities.

Section 2 - of the bill provides for an immediate effective date.

EXISTING LAW: Currently, registered sex offenders are permitted to reside in community residences.

PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: New bill.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: None.

LOCAL IMPACT: None.

EFFECTIVE DATE: The bill would take effect immediately.


Text

STATE OF NEW YORK ________________________________________________________________________ 7503 IN SENATE May 15, 2014 ___________
Introduced by Sen. RANZENHOFER -- read twice and ordered printed, and when printed to be committed to the Committee on Crime Victims, Crime and Correction AN ACT to amend the correction law, in relation to prohibiting sex offenders from residing in community homes THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The correction law is amended by adding a new section 168- ee to read as follows: S 168-EE. COMMUNITY RESIDENCES. ANY SEX OFFENDER REGISTERED PURSUANT TO THIS ARTICLE SHALL BE PROHIBITED FROM RESIDING IN A COMMUNITY RESI- DENCE. A COMMUNITY RESIDENCE, FOR PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION, SHALL BE DEFINED AS ANY FACILITY OPERATED BY OR SUBJECT TO LICENSURE BY THE OFFICE OF MENTAL HEALTH OR THE OFFICE FOR PEOPLE WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES WHICH PROVIDES A SUPERVISED RESIDENCE OR RESIDENTIAL RESPITE SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL DISABILITIES. S 2. This act shall take effect immediately.

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